How To Let Go Of What Other People Think & Boost Your Self-Confidence

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We’ve all felt the sting of being let down, frustrated, unfulfilled and not quite good enough in our lives and in our relationships. I have been guilty of having unrealistic expectations of others, wanting them to fill me up with compliments, approval and validation, sometimes even trying to control situations or outcomes in an attempt to get what I thought would make me feel successful. It was a painful, exhausting way to live.

Studies show that basing our self-worth on external factors is actually harmful to our mental health. One study at the University of Michigan found that college students who base their self-worth on external sources (including academic performance, appearance and approval from others) reported more stress, anger, academic problems and relationship conflicts. They also had higher levels of alcohol and drug use, as well as more symptoms of eating disorders. The same study found that students who based their self-worth on internal sources, not only felt better, but also received higher grades and were less likely to use drugs and alcohol or to develop eating disorders.

Through the consistent practices of self-compassion and meditation, I’ve discovered a few perspective shifts that have transformed my sense of self-worth. I’ve found that when I base my self-worth on who I am and my inherent value as a human being rather than what others think or how much I achieve, my confidence soars and my inner critic quiets.

1. Learn to develop self-sufficiency.

For the majority of my life, I got my self-worth from the outside world—someone else’s approval or validation dictated how I felt about myself. What a set up that is! I’ve learned that when we place our worth outside of ourselves (career, money, material possessions, relationships, appearance), we can never have enough or be enough.

Being independent from someone else’s thoughts of me (both positive and negative), and instead trusting in God/Spirit/Universe for my value, I have become more self-sufficient and as a result, experience more peace, freedom and material success.

Sure, compliments are very nice to hear, but my mood, mental and physical health and worth are no longer dependent on another’s approval of me. As long as we are basing our worth on another’s opinion of us or how people choose to treat us, we will never be able to live up to our full potential and experience true joy.

2. Let people off the hook.

Instead of looking to others for validation to make us feel worthy or enough, how about reframing to the notion that nobody owes us anything.

When we are truly anchored in our own self-love, and get our self-worth from our own unique qualities that make us one-of-a-kind, we become self-sufficient. We don’t need to go to our partners, friends, work, food, alcohol or social media for a quick ego boost. We can turn inward and look to a Higher Power for our value, knowing we are enough simply because we are alive.

3. People can’t give you what they don’t have.

There’s been many times I’ve looked to a significant other, boss, parent or friend to tell me something to make me feel better, or treat me a certain way so I could feel valued, respected and loved. But if a client simply doesn’t have any more money in their budget to pay me, they can’t give it to me, and perhaps the solution is find another opportunity where the compensation matches the value, skills and experience I bring to the table. Maybe our partner isn’t respecting us because he or she lacks self-respect. If a customer service representative is frustrating us because they can’t help us with our request, maybe that person hasn’t been properly trained and is simply doing the best they can.

I’ve learned that the people who have cheated us, hurt us or done us wrong cannot necessarily make amends—either they are unwilling or unable. By waiting for and expecting others to apologize, make it up to us or even admit they were wrong, we assume their actions can make us feel whole again. But when we are dependent on others to make us happy or behave a certain way, we will always be disappointed on some level.

The good news is if we put our faith in the God of our own understanding, we will never be let down. The Universe is self-organizing and self-correcting.

4. It’s not about keeping everyone happy, it’s about fulfilling our life’s purpose.

As long as we are doing our best, honoring ourselves and our purpose, we will feel less and less inclined to seek the approval of others. Instead of feeling offended when people fail to acknowledge us, what if we could see it as an opportunity to expand and grow? What if we embraced the fact that we are being prepared to take our lives to the next level and start fulfilling our mission?

The less I depend on people to validate me, the stronger my emotional muscles become, and in turn, the stronger my sense of self-worth. I have accomplished more both personally and professionally in less time and need fewer compliments to keep me going simply because of my faith in myself and in the Universe. Focusing on the special characteristics that make me ME is much easier and rewarding than waiting for someone to say or do something that will make me feel good for only a matter of minutes before I need my next “fix.”

Our lives truly become more full when we turn our attention inward to the miracle that we are, release expectations and stay detached from outcomes and other people’s opinions. I’m not saying it is always easy, but it is definitely a practice worth committing to. Try it out for yourself, and let me know how it goes!

Peace & Love, Kate

How To Unsubscribe From The Struggle And Find True Contentment

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As the new year rang in, and messages like, “Make it happen!” and “Grab the bull by the horns!” bombarded me everywhere I turned, all I felt like doing was taking a nap and quietly reflecting and resting.

My first thought was that something was wrong with me for not wanting to achieve a new goal, or make anything happen. I simply wanted to do nothing, and a part of me was judging myself for it. I took to my meditation pillow for some guidance, asking my higher self for some insight.

The response I received was:

“Do nothing. You need to rest. Take a moment to reflect and honor yourself for everything you achieved even just last year alone. No wonder you are exhausted.”

As a Type-A, over-achieving go-getter, the notion of doing nothing feels like death to the ego. Much of my life (like many other people) has been defined by what I accomplish in the material world, and proving my worth to myself and others. I know I am not alone in feeling guilt and judgment for wanting to slow down and just be.

In the spirit of a fresh year, I decided to try something new: surrender to my inner wisdom and truth.

I took my slow work schedule as a sign and signal to ask myself who I am without all my achievements and accomplishments in the outside world. Who am I without my career, looks, money, fancy clothes, car and condo? What does it really mean to live a “good life?”

Even just a year ago, if I had a month off of work, I would have freaked out and gone into panic mode about how my bills would get paid and why I wasn’t booking more jobs. I decided I was tired of that way of thinking. It’s exhausting and doesn’t attract anything positive into my life. Instead of pushing, forcing or trying to “make things happen,” I’m consciously choosing to do less and let go of trying to control the situation.

As a suicide prevention awareness advocate, one of my messages is, “Never give up.” But when it comes to trying to control and manipulate outcomes in our lives, I’m discovering that “giving up” is necessary. Giving up isn’t throwing in the towel, it’s an act of faith. It’s a powerful devotion to a higher power.

Giving up or surrendering as an act of faith is a whole new way of problem-solving. It is a more grounding and peaceful approach to getting what we want more easily. It is the opposite of rushing around or forcing, it is about letting ourselves and our lives unfold more naturally, piece by piece, layer by layer.

It reminds me of nature. Nature does not struggle to express its beauty and glory. Flowers weren’t created to struggle, and neither were we as human beings. That’s just a lie we’ve been told in a “Be productive and make it happen!” society. But we don’t have to subscribe to the struggle.

Let 2017 be the year we unsubscribe from the struggle!

It is easier to give up the struggle when we realize our lives are so much more than what we achieve materially. What if we could begin to see ourselves and our lives with fresh new eyes, and focus more on our emotional journey home to our true selves?

My goals are no longer wrapped up in a dream job or relationship—both of which are fantastic, but nothing outside of ourselves can give us lasting happiness. My new goal is radical self-acceptance, inner peace and deep, fulfilling joy. Some days, that looks like hard work in the outside world, and other days, it means staying home in my pajamas taking care of my inner child, feeling my feelings, giving myself empathy and conserving energy.

Society tells us how acceptable it is to work ourselves to exhaustion in the name of making “it” happen—a career, relationship, family, business—but not nearly enough time and attention is paid to our emotional journey home to ourselves.

I really fought myself for not feeling like doing anything for days. As it turns out, “not doing anything” was achieving something extraordinary—a beautiful, healthy, kind, loving relationship with myself. When we learn to stop pushing and accept the perfection of what is, we can enjoy the perfect place we are in.

Sometimes “giving up” as an act of faith is all we need. Try it out for yourself!

View my story on elephantjournal.com.

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